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Beyonce Puts Solange In The Hot Seat for Interview Magazine

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Interview Magazine keeps it all in the family in their latest February issue, as Solange Knowles is placed in the hot seat only to be interviewed by her big sis.

Totally slaying the cover (and the entire shoot actually) shot by Mikael Jansson, the ‘Don’t Touch My Hair’  singer appears ever so elegant wearing the likes of DKNY, Marni, David Hart, Miu Miu and Balengciaga.

During the interview, conducted by Beyonce, the two Grammy nominated sisters discuss songwriting, comparisons between their father Mathew Knowles and Master P, and the influence of their hometown of Houston. Beyonce even recalls that one rapper Solange ‘acted a fool’ over fine ass Nas.

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During the interview, Solange also opens up about what it was like to have Queen Bey as a big sis.

“You did a kickass job! “You were the most patient, loving, wonderful sister ever. In the 30 years that we’ve been together, I think we’ve only really, like, butted heads … we can count on one hand.”

Bey  also shared a few tidbits about her talented little sis saying, “I’m so happy to interview you because, clearly, I’m your biggest fan and I’m super proud of you.” She later added, “I remember thinking, ‘My little sister is going to be something super special,’ because you always seemed to know what you wanted.”

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BEYONCÉ: Are you exhausted? I know you had a parent-teacher conference …

SOLANGE: Yeah, I actually had to fly to Philly because there were no flights left to New York. And now I’m driving from Philly to New York. Well, I’m not driving, but …

BEYONCÉ: You have to drive? From Philly?

SOLANGE: Yeah. But it’s not bad. It’s only an hour and 40 minutes.

BEYONCÉ: Oh my God! Rock star. Well, it is a bit strange, because we’re sisters and we talk all the time, to be interviewing you. But I’m so happy to interview you because, clearly, I’m your biggest fan and I’m super proud of you. So we’ll start from the beginning. Growing up, you were always attracted to the most interesting fashion, music, and art. You were obsessed with Alanis Morissette and Minnie Riperton and mixing prints with your clothes … when you were only 10 years old. You would lock yourself in a room with your drum set and a record player and write songs. Do you remember that? Of course you do.

SOLANGE: I do. [both laugh]

BEYONCÉ: What else attracted you growing up?

SOLANGE: I remember having so much perspective about my voice, and how to use my voice, at such a young age—whether it was through dance, poetry, or coming up with different projects. I guess I always felt a yearning to communicate—I had a lot of things to say. And I appreciated y’all’s patience in the house during all of these different phases. They were not ever very introverted, quiet phases.

BEYONCÉ: No, not at all. [both laugh] I remember thinking, “My little sister is going to be something super special,” because you always seemed to know what you wanted. And I’m just curious, where did that come from?

SOLANGE: I have no idea, to be honest! I always knew what I wanted. We damn sure know that I wasn’t always right. [both laugh] But I’d sit firm, whether I was right or wrong. I guess a part of that was being the baby of the family and being adamant that, in a house of five, my voice was being heard. Another part is that I remember being really young and having this voice inside that told me to trust my gut. And my gut has been really, really strong in my life. It’s pretty vocal and it leads me. Sometimes I haven’t listened, and those times didn’t end up very well for me. I think all of our family—you and mom—we’re all very intuitive people. A lot of that comes through our mother, her always following her gut, and I think that spoke to me really loudly at a young age and encouraged me to do the same.

BEYONCÉ: You write your own lyrics, you co-produce your own tracks, you write your own treatments for your videos, you stage all of your performances, all of the choreography … Where does the inspiration come from?

Dig into the full interview here

 



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